Fusion is the process which powers the sun and makes all life on earth possible. In Nuclear Fusion process the energy is produced by fusing together light atoms, such as hydrogen, at the extremely high pressures and high temperatures which exist at the center of the sun (15 million ºC). At the high temperatures experienced in the sun, gas becomes plasma. Nuclear fusion is the most basic form of energy in the universe. It is what powers the sun and all of the stars. It is produced by a nuclear reaction in which two atoms of the same lightweight element, usually an isotope of hydrogen, combine into a single molecule of helium, the next heavier element on the periodic table.

Visiting JET, the Joint European Torus - the world's largest operational magnetically confined plasma physics experiment, located at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in Oxfordshire, UK.

  “It consoles me to see that while technology has always been gendered, the seeds of possibility have been there from the beginning. We can use technological tools to build the landscapes of our dreams, rather than to model the constructs of our existing reality. It's not too late for us. While the past's failed utopian aspirations demonstrate what could have been, they also show us what we could still become. ”  The problem of anthropogenic climate change may be urging the development of new sources of energy like fusion power but it is also changing the character of the public discourse about nuclear technology. In Europe 37% are against and 20% in favor of Fusion energy. People associate nuclear technology with terms like "bomb", events like Chernobyl or even

“It consoles me to see that while technology has always been gendered, the seeds of possibility have been there from the beginning. We can use technological tools to build the landscapes of our dreams, rather than to model the constructs of our existing reality. It's not too late for us. While the past's failed utopian aspirations demonstrate what could have been, they also show us what we could still become.

The problem of anthropogenic climate change may be urging the development of new sources of energy like fusion power but it is also changing the character of the public discourse about nuclear technology. In Europe 37% are against and 20% in favor of Fusion energy. People associate nuclear technology with terms like "bomb", events like Chernobyl or even

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“Globally, the greatest challenge for energy is going to be cooling,” says Martin Freer, director of the Birmingham Energy Institute at the University of Birmingham. “With the growth of the middle class in India and China, there will be an associated demand for air conditioning. The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggest that by the middle of the present century, the demand for cooling will outstrip the demand for heating.”

THE FUTURE OF FUSION ENERGY

Energy is the lifeline of modern economic and human activity, with most consumed for mobility, by industry and households. Yet, about 1.3 billion people lack access to affordable modern energy, impeding development. It is estimated that by 2040, the world’s energy consumption will have increased by almost 50%.

about the project:

Project aims to develop a traveling exhibition about the work being done in EUROfusion - a consortium of national fusion research institutes located in European Union and Switzerland.

Our work focuses on creating an interactive participatory experience of the different models (ETM) of the future based on the economic and environmental research done by EUROfusion team.

The EUROfusion TIMES Model (ETM) is a tool to reproduce the energy system of the world and give a picture of its evolution in the future, based on the hypotheses on future decisions by politicians in terms of environment behavior of people, energy resources and potentials. Through ETM we can understand a potential energy mix composition in 2100 as well as the evolution of energy throughout the years until 2100.

Currently the project is in the research phase were we explore the potentials of fusion energy and what kind of impact, once produced, it would have in the world. How will the future with fusion look like?  What are the pros and cons of that reality? As part of our research we look closely into the subjects such as: nuclear stigma, gender equality in massive science research projects, transmedia storytelling. The main question of that research is: what are the ways of engaging lay people in the dialogue about this kind of big research projects?

 

Team:

Annelie Berner, Monika Seyfried and Joshua Walton