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The Deletion Bureau kit and Newspaper for 2038 Headline: IOHT (Internet of Heritage Things) has gone too far! After seeing an 79% drop of online devotees, hassled by insisting interferences coming from the collection's networked artefact, SFOMA is the first museum going entirely offline

Transformation Machine We created a machine that literally transformed participants objects into tokens.

  Antonine Wall Highlight  We used the machine learning algorithm, t-SNE, to group the artworks by visual similarity.

Antonine Wall Highlight We used the machine learning algorithm, t-SNE, to group the artworks by visual similarity.

AI training interface designed by Annelie Berner

  Collage: Chips in Bodies  This collage envisions a future museum where "every human's obliged to carry condensed info of 5 objects of their choice. With your device you can re-experience your objects or retrieve objects from other people. To enhance your objects, use the central museum enhancer and share object data with other visitors."

Collage: Chips in Bodies This collage envisions a future museum where "every human's obliged to carry condensed info of 5 objects of their choice. With your device you can re-experience your objects or retrieve objects from other people. To enhance your objects, use the central museum enhancer and share object data with other visitors."

  Re-Experiencing Device  Participants imagined a re-experiencing device where they could take their transformed object and experience its web of intellectual connections.

Re-Experiencing Device Participants imagined a re-experiencing device where they could take their transformed object and experience its web of intellectual connections.

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FUTURESCAPING WORKSHOP

Together with University of Newcastle researchers we created an immersive experience for 8 experts in heritage from European museums, to tackle a difficult scenario that could exist in our future.

Scenario

Based on research about current trends, indicators and technologies, we imagine a future where museums are so overwhelmed by the amount of items that should count as European heritage, they can no longer keep their full collections and must delete 20% of it every year. To figure out what to delete and how this challenge would affect the museum experience of this future, on the day of the workshop, our experts form the Deletion Bureau.
We used speculative design and design fiction methods to create materials for this future, such as newspapers, films and a series of physical prototypes, to immerse our participants in this future scenario.

Workshop

Two major tasks were designed to stimulate debate and push our participants to articulate their values and visions for the futures of European heritage.


In the first task, the Deletion Bureau negotiated about what kinds of heritage-items they should keep or discard. Each team in the Deletion Bureau created a conceptual algorithm for an artificial intelligence to help sort through the millions of items.
In the second task, the Deletion Bureau re-imagined the act of Deletion, they transformed objects they could not keep in the typical form, into alternative forms - such as the DNA that can build the object, or a chip carried in a human's body. They created ways to re-experience these transformed objects - for if in the future, we want to access their essential qualities again.
Finally, the Deletion Bureau designed new types of museums and social interactions for these transformed objects.


Our Deletion Bureau articulated hopes, fears and desires around the future of (European) heritage - designing shared and universally accessible collections, desiring to affirm the subjectivity of heritage artefacts; and fears, such as losing the material object in favour of its digital versions.
We created the futurescaping workshop to explore the farthest edges of defining heritage and the role of museums. The workshop was designed to move the group beyond their usual mindsets and limits in order to focus on the essence of European heritage. Through fictional scenario-setting, diegetic prototypes and machines, the workshop suspended our participant's disbelief so that they could sincerely consider and speculate about possible futures that stretch beyond the visible horizon.  

 

 

Completed by CIID Research as part of the CoHERE project

Project Team:

CIID Research + Design team: Monika Seyfried, Annelie Berner

Calle Norgenskold (graphic design), Peter  Kuhberg (machine & interface design)

Partner research team: Gabi Arrigoni, Areti Galani

Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning Consultant: Andreas Refsgaard

Video-making: Emmanuel Tenenbaum, Gizem Boyacioglu

Scenario video actor: Yuxi Liu

Workshop participants: Maria Economou, Campbell Price, Cindy Zalm, Monika Hagedorn-Saupe, Joanna Król, Wayne Modest, Stamatis Schizakis, Annemarie de Wildt